Another guitarist better than Hendrix…

If you have short-term memory problems, or haven’t visited the site before, you’ll know that I am not a huge fan of Jimi Hendrix having received as many accolades as he has. He’s been named Best Guitarist of All Time and Guitarist of the Century.

Don’t get me wrong, Hendrix was a good guitarist. He took things from other artists, put them together in a package all his own, and did things with the guitar (in totality) that other guitarists simply weren’t doing at the time.

But, listen to his live stuff. He couldn’t stay in key, couldn’t play the same thing twice, knew maybe a dozen basic progressions and scales, and was remarkably sloppy.

I won’t deny that he was influential. I can even say that he’s influenced me. I can also say, with some absolute certainty, that I can play everything Hendrix played and I can play it better than he did. It’s not hard. If you want something difficult, try Leyenda (Asturias).

So, without further ado, let’s examine the 2nd guitarist who was far more deserving of being called Greatest.
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What’s the deal with arpeggios?

Alright, kids. It’s time for another lesson with TheBuddha. We’re going to talk about arpeggios.

What are arpeggios and why should you care?

Well, if you’ve been playing guitar for any length of time, you’ve already come across them. Chances are, you already play them – and may not even know what they are. They are basically component parts of a chord.

Play a chord. Now, play the notes that make up that chord, one by one. That’s a basic arpeggio. No, a scale isn’t an arpeggio. A scale is a sequence of notes in a certain key. An arpeggio is a sequence of notes within a chord. Another name for the arpeggio is “broken chord.”

The word arpeggio comes from Italian. It means to play a harp. Yup, imagine a harpist playing one string at a time in succession, and you’ve got an arpeggio. The same theory applies. If it doesn’t sound right, you’re doing it wrong and you should try again. (We’re not big on formalities at this here establishment!)

Seriously, make a D chord and play the 3 2 1 strings, one at a time. There, you just played an arpeggio.

So, why should you know this?

They sound good – really. You’ll hear them in all sorts of music and you’ve been playing them for years without even knowing. I suppose they probably come from classical but they are found in rock, bluegrass, jazz, and probably a bunch of other genres.

They are much handier than just the subset of chords you might know. Learn a few basic arpeggio shapes and you’re good to go – you can play them in any key. I am not going to get into all the shapes and the progressions, ‘cause there are all sorts of resources for you to use just from searching. My goal is just to get you started.

To get started the rest of the way, this site has a really good write-up about arpeggios:

Click to read very good introduction to arpeggios.

(I recommend learning the major and minor triad first. They’re the most approachable.)

If you’re in doubt, start with the root note and go from there. If you’re playing in G, start with a G. Try a few different ways to pick and try a few different styles – do a hammer on and a string bend. Trust me, just keep poking at it and it will eventually come to you. You’ll find your own little style inside the arpeggio world and you’ll be able to accompany anybody, especially another guitarist who’s doing chordal rhythms.

One final thing – don’t let the notes sustain. Lift as soon as you pick or in time with the duration. You don’t want them to run into each other and make a mess of things. That means you’re making a chord and not playing an arpeggio.

So, don’t let them scare you away. Don’t worry about the theory. Find a technique that sounds good to you and practice it until you’re happy. Find a few more techniques and truly enjoy yourself. The goal is to have fun. If you wanted mastery, you’d go to a good music school and not listen to some weirdo named TheBuddha.

This will be archived over at the forum when I get a minute.

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Greatest Guitarist of All Time? I think not!

Rolling Stone Magazine rated Jimi Hendrix as Greatest Guitarist of All Time. This has, for a variety of reasons, bothered me. I don’t mean it’s bothered me just a little, I mean it’s driven me to make passionate rants in front of otherwise nice people.

The truth of the matter is that Jimi was not the great guitarist that people seem to credit him as being. Don’t get me wrong. Jimi was a great artist and his contribution to music isn’t to be taken lightly. He’s just not even remotely the Greatest Guitarist of All Time. He wasn’t even the greatest guitarist of his era.

It’s from this that I ended up having a conversation with a fella named @cynicaloldfart and they were pretty smart about it. They asked me who I felt was the best guitarist – and I had an immediate answer. (That answer is Les Paul, by the way. Without him, we’d still be banging proverbial rocks together and strumming on fig leaves.)

This led to a second question – who else? Then, it led to the idea that I should compile a list of guitarists who are better than Hendrix. This seemed remarkably cathartic and I’ve now decided to begin publishing this list. Suffice to say, I’ve quite a few folks on that list – all of whom are better than Hendrix ever dreamed of being.

Running with his question, I’ve decided to compile a list of guitarists that are really very good and deserving of accolades. I’ve taken a scholastic approach to this, though it’s not so refined as to ever be suitable for publication in an academic journal. Instead, it’s meant to give us a moment of healing, a time when we can feel better about the injustices that have been done to us – like naming Hendrix as the greatest guitarist of all time.

I present the very first in what’s a fairly long list of guitarists who are greater than Hendrix. I will attempt to quantify the unquantifiable and to justify each selection. I highly encourage people to respond and let me know if you’d like a new guitarist featured, one that you think is better than Hendrix ever was. I, of course, will decide if you’re suggestion has merit and will consider it for inclusion on the list.

There is no guarantee about the length of the list (I currently have a dozen to get us started) or the regularity with which I’ll post. I’ll aim to get a new guitarist added to the list, one each week, and we’ll see where it goes from there.

Without further ado, I present to you the start of the list and our first guitarist greater than Hendrix ever thought of being:

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And so it begins…

I suppose, I should probably make some testing posts and make sure that things are working properly. I’ve quite a few things installed and this looks like I’ll be mostly happy with this server.

I hope I needn’t remind folks that they’re to be on their best, most civil, behavior. This is meant to be a pretty helpful site and we can’t keep it running (we, ’cause I want you to be involved) if we’re not well behaved. The hosting company has standards and we don’t really meet them, but I’m hoping we can fake it well enough.

So, what goes here? Well, we’re going to learn about the guitar in an organized fashion. Ha! I lied…. There’s nothing organized about this.

I’ll get a forum installed in a little while, but this is about all I’m up for doing today. This isn’t going to be a high volume site, unless you pitch in and help make it a high volume site. So, what you get out of here is what you put into here. Otherwise, you just get what I put into here and I’m a pretty busy fella.

Thanks for your cooperation,
TheBuddha

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